Mandel School International Study-Abroad

3-Credit Study Abroad: International Change Agents Wanted!

We are now accepting applications for our popular short-term study abroad courses during Winter Break (Fall 2017):

+ Ecuador: Health, Human and Social Development (SASS 375A/575; 3 credits)

+ India: Global Health and Social Development (SASS 375G/575; 3 credits)

Open to all undergraduate and graduate students at Case Western Reserve (any major), the Mandel School’s short-term Study Abroad program travels to nearly every continent on earth and offers 3-credit courses that provide the experience of a lifetime.The trips are led by experienced faculty who have been traveling to these countries for nearly a decade. One-third of all CWRU short-term Study Abroad programs are offered by the Mandel School — reflecting our commitment to and enthusiasm for international study.

For more details or to apply, contact Program Director Dr. Mark Chupp or Program Manager Valerie Rambin at Valerie.Rambin@case.edu.

University Statement on Safety and Security Precautions

Study abroad courses are open to undergraduate and graduate students of all majors as 3 credit-hour electives led by Mandel School faculty. The courses can also count toward credit for Global or Cultural Diversity for Arts & Sciences majors, Social Science credit for Engineering, or the Social Work minor. All require mandatory pre- and post-trip meetings and assignments.

  • Study Abroad courses are multi-disciplinary and include in-depth study and immersion in countries in Europe and Central America.
  • Students meet with community and neighborhood leaders, researchers, faculty, policy makers, social workers, and other practitioners and clients.
  • All programs have a minimum of two professionals traveling with the group and staying at the same accommodations.
  • Most programs include: International airfare (some programs), in-country travel, double or triple occupancy accommodations, facilitators, translation (where needed), international and regional staff to guide the trip, all program fees, agency visits, guest lecturers, and 1 to 3 meals per day (depending on the program).
  • Programs do not include: Passport, vaccinations and visas (where needed), tips, course credit hours/tuition, the non-student and non-CWRU student professional development fee of $400.00, transportation to and from CWRU to the airport, non-program travel and meals not included by the program.


Expand the section to view course descriptions corresponding to each country.

Global Health and Social Development in India (SASS 375G/575)

Program Location (Please list all cities and countries): India (New Delhi, Vrindavan, Agra, Jaipur, Tilonia, Sawai Madhopur, Ranthambore)

Program Dates: January 2, 2017 – January 15, 2017 (Saturday pre-trip seminars September 24 and November 5; Saturday post-trip seminar January 28, 2017)

Faculty Leaders:

Deborah Jacobson, Assistant Professor   216.368.6014

Tej Pareek, Adjunct Professor and Research Associate  216.368.4994

Course Description:

This 3-credit experiential course will focus on health and socio-economic issues of development to a fast-changing India. This course will familiarize students with Indian social development and social policy issues in regards to multicultural aspects of healthcare, poverty alleviation, non-formal education, and application of information communication technologies in addressing social problems. In India the course will include guided tours of neighborhoods, field action project sites, health, social and educational institutions and government establishments. Daily lectures by practicing social workers, healthcare professionals, policy advocates, field workers, government officials and eminent Indian scholars and researchers will further enhance students’ understanding. Students will also become acquainted with the history and culture of India, its social, political and economic development and the impact it has on the delivery of social services.

While in-country, students will not only experience the challenges and opportunities of rising economy but will also learn from the rich historic and cultural heritage of India. Over 15 days, students will spend 13 days in India, travel 1,800 km by bus and train, cover four major states, six major cities, and visit 19 major project sites focused on global health and social development. Some project sites include (subject to change):

  • Vrindavan- visit Vatsalyagram, a non-profit focusing on child and women empowerment with a unique alternative to women’s shelters and orphanages (vatsalyagram.org)
  • Agra- visit the Tajmahal, a UNESCO World Heritage site
  • Jaipur- visit to Jaipur Foot, an NGO that provides prosthetics free of charge (http://jaipurfoot.org/); visit Akshaya Patra and attend a workshop at the world’s largest mid-day meal program (akshayapatra.org); visit SURMAN Project, a unique child orphanage (www.surmansansthanglobal.org); visit Ayurveda to participate in a yoga workshop to better understand traditional preventive medicine
  • Tilonia- visit Barefoot College (barefootcollege.org)
  • Sawai Madhopur- visit the Tiger Safari and Village to experience forest ecology and traditional rural life in India
  • New Delhi- meet with policy makers of Polio Eradication; visit the Lotus Temple; visit Goonji Project, a non-profit dedicated to eradicating poverty through civic engagement (http://goonj.org)

For more information contact Valerie Rambin (var26@case.edu), International Program Manager

Contact Nancy Issa (nxi@case.edu) for Financial Aid eligibility for travel costs

APPLY NOW: Health, Human and Social Development in Ecuador (SASS 375A/575)

 

Program Dates: January 1, 2017 – January 15, 2017

Pre-trip seminars September 24 and November 5; post-trip seminar January 28, 2017

 

Course Leaders:

Mark Chupp, Assistant Professor

Sonia Minnes, Associate Professor

 

Approved for: Global and Cultural Diversity credit, Social Science credit for Engineering students, Social Work Minor credit, Elective Course credit

 

Course Description: This 3-credit course to Quito, the Amazon Basin and rural highlands of Ecuador will acquaint students with the history and culture of Ecuador, its social, political and economic development, and the impact it has on human development and the delivery of human services. Ecuador’s historical and current relationship with the United States will also be explored. This course provides an integrated approach to the study of multicultural issues related to policies and services that center around human and community development and healthcare in Ecuador.

 

Through visits in urban and rural Ecuador, students will be exposed to knowledge of the country’s history, biodiversity, environment, politics, economic system, social and health services, and the rich diversity of the people. Students will visit programs in health and traditional medicine, environmental issues, education, and child welfare. A unique way of understanding the cultural diversity will be through home stays in small groups with Quichua indigenous families, a highlight for past students. The course also includes several days in the Amazon rainforest where students will explore a different Ecuadorian lifestyle influenced by the native people, flora and fauna and traditional medicine.

 

Some project site visits include (subject to change):

 

This course is designed for students and professionals who are interested in developing an international perspective for the study of social work and related health and community development fields. It will expose students to various intervention models within a cultural context and provide opportunities for cross-cultural comparison.

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Chupp, Director of International Education Programs, or Valerie Rambin, International Education Programs Manager about this or other Mandel School study abroad programs. Contact Nancy Issa Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.

NEW for May 2017: 21st Century Ghana: Culture, Institutions and Development In West Africa (SASS 575)

Program Dates: May 14 – 29, 2017

Pre-trip seminars February 18 and April 8; post-trip seminar TBD

Course Leaders:

Mark Joseph

Joy Bostic, Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies

Approved for: Global and Cultural Diversity credit, Social Science credit for Engineering students, Social Work Minor credit, Elective Course credit

Course Description: This two-week, 3-credit study abroad course to Ghana, West Africa will introduce students to the history and culture of Ghana, its social, political and economic development, and current social issues and institutional responses. The immense potential and enduring challenges of sub-Saharan Africa will serve as a contextual backdrop to this course’s focus on Ghana, one of the continent’s most politically and economically stable countries. In 2011, Ghana had the world’s fastest growing economy but has since struggled to sustain this growth. The dynamics between developing countries and multinational aid organizations will also be examined. Two key tensions in modern day Ghana will be explored. First, the tension between the traditions of the past and the exigencies of the globalizing present. Second the tension between increased quality of life and access to opportunity for some, juxtaposed against deep enduring poverty and hardship for much of the population.

Site visits and activities may include (subject to change):

  • Accra: hospital visit, primary school visit, community development agency visit, international aid agency visit, Kwame Nkrumah Mausoleum, WEB Dubois Memorial Centre for Pan-African Culture, walking tour of slum areas – Gamashie, Nima or Jamestown, Artist Alliance Art Gallery, University of Ghana – Legon, Ashesi University/Local village community Berekuso, Accra Mall, optional church service
  • Central Region: Cape Coast or Elmina Slave Castle, Kakum National Forest and Canopy Walk, beach visit, village visit: Atwia or Krofu, primary school visit
  • Kumasi: Manyhia Palace, National Cultural Center, Central Market, craft villages of Bonwire and Adowonmase, Glass and Adrinka village, Cocoa Farm
  • Homestay with a Ghanaian family
  • Work shadowing with a Ghanaian professional
  • Village community service project

Apply here. For more information, contact Dr. Mark Chupp, Director of International Education Programs, or Valerie Rambin, International Education Programs Manager about this or other Mandel School study abroad programs. Contact Nancy Issa for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.

Child Welfare in Guatemala (SASS 375D/575)

Program Dates: March 10 – March 19, 2017

Pre-trip seminars January 28 and February 18; post-trip seminar April 15

 

Course Leaders:

Zoe Breen Wood

Victor Groza

 

Approved for: Global and Cultural Diversity credit, Social Science credit for Engineering students, Social Work Minor credit, Elective Course credit

 

Course description: This 3-credit course is designed to familiarize participants with the culture and history of Guatemala, as well as study child welfare from a community development perspective. All students will spend some time each morning to learn Spanish, followed by guided tours of various organizations. The experience will challenge participants to compare Guatemala with the United States at social, economic and political levels. The program is an intense, small group experience in living, learning, traveling and studying. Students will study child welfare issues, social services and indigenous community practices, and understand the strengths and weaknesses of social policies and human services in both Guatemala and the U.S. The course acquaints participants with the socio-political factors that influence the development of child welfare programs in the nongovernmental sector (private, nonprofit) and governmental sector in Guatemala. The role of the helping professions in child welfare are explored via agency visits, lectures and collaboration with Guatemalan professionals.

 

Some project site visits include (subject to change):

  • Santiago Zamora, some of the women in this town have established a cooperative in order to demonstrate their skills, to help contribute to the income of their own community and to improve the future of the local children by raising awareness of the importance of education as well as improving the education opportunities for local children (http://thenewschoolcollaborates.blogspot.com/2009/06/la-comunidad-de-santiago-zamora.html)
  • Casa Shalom, an orphanage for disadvantaged children and youth developed by North American missionaries that opened in 1987 and based on Christian principles (http://www.casashalom.net/weben.html)
  • Safe Passage, a non-profit organization in Guatemala City that brings hope, education, and opportunity to the children and families living in extreme poverty around the City’s garbage dump (http://www.safepassage.org/)
  • Los Patojos, an after school program from children of the community Jocatenango located just outside of Antigua. Students will participate in a service learning activity at Los Patojos (https://www.justworldinternational.org/project-partners/los-patojos/)
  • Overnight excursion outside of Antigua to visit ancient ruins, and observe some of the service delivery issues in more rural areas

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Chupp, Director of International Education Programs, or Valerie Rambin, International Education Programs Manager about this or other Mandel School study abroad programs. Contact Nancy Issa for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.

 

Gender and Sexuality Justice: LGBTQ life in Contemporary Dutch Culture (SASS 375F/575)

 

Program Dates: March 10 – March 19, 2017

Pre-trip seminars January 28 and February 18; post-trip seminar April 8

 

Course Leaders:

Elisabeth Roccoforte, Director of CWRU Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Center

 

Approved for: Global and Cultural Diversity credit, Social Science credit for Engineering students, Social Work Minor credit, Elective Course credit

 

Course description: This 3-credit experiential and hands-on course explores the Dutch concept of “tolerance” through the lenses of sexuality, gender identity and gender expression. The course will investigate the Dutch concept of “tolerance” as it applies to LGBT people, by interrogating the ways in which the social discourse of acceptance is complicated by other salient sociopolitical factors such as historical and contemporary realities about immigration, religious diversity, age, ethnicity and race.

 

Students will have opportunities to meet with academics, activists, social workers and LGBT community volunteers who work with a wide variety of the community. Special attention will be paid to best practices in caring for LGBT elders, ethnic minority LGBT youth, as well as transgender individuals within the sex work community.

 

This course seeks to teach students the value of cross-cultural dialogue, especially within the context of the challenges and triumphs of LGBT people. Ultimately, students will be exposed to the complexities embedded within the experience of being LGBT in the Netherlands and compare it to the ways it is both similar and dissimilar to the experience of U.S. LGBT communities.

 

The course begins with a brief orientation on late Saturday afternoon and Saturday evening is free to explore the city! Sunday is also an open day, but Sunday evening is reserved for a walking tour of the Red Light District with a focus on providing information and context of the Red Light District through the lens of queer theory, gender studies and feminism. Students will have unstructured free time on the weekend after the course to travel. Tentative schedule (subject to change):

  • Monday: lectures from Dutch experts at Vrije Universiteit (Free University) in Amsterdam on Dutch tolerance, euthanasia, substance use and abuse, and sex work (prostitution) (http://www.english.uva.nl/start.cfm)
  • Tuesday: visit the most famous parts of LGBT Amsterdam including, the Homomonument which opened in 1987 and is the only gay monument in the world, Pink Point a gay and lesbian information and souvenir shop situated at the Homomonument, Westermarkt (on the Keizersgracht)
  • Tuesday: visit the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam (http://www.amc.nl/), the largest tertiary care hospital in the country. Meet with globally renowned and controversial researcher and academic Dr. Dick Swaab and listen to a special lecture about his theories about transsexualism, gay men and the brain
  • Wednesday: travel to Rotterdam to visit Humanitas and converse both with the LGBT elders who live in the facility as well as the coordinators of the acclaimed programs developed for the care of LGBT elders
  • Thursday: tour a variety of locations in Amsterdam, possibilities include IHLIA, an international gay/lesbian library, archive, information and documentation center about homosexuality and sexual diversity; volunteers with COC Netherlands, the country’s largest LGBT advocacy group; members of the Transgender Network of Amsterdam; attend lectures/discussions with faculty members from the Amsterdam Research Center for Gender and Sexuality (ARC-GS) at the University of Amsterdam; meet with members of Workplace Pride, a non-profit umbrella foundation based in Amsterdam that strives for greater acceptance of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people in the workplace and in society
  • Friday: the “Great Debate” where you have an opportunity to make persuasive arguments for or against various Dutch practices or social policies as they apply here at home (or “not”)

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Chupp, Director of International Education Programs, or Valerie Rambin, International Education Programs Manager about this or other Mandel School study abroad programs. Contact Nancy Issa for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.

Mental Health Issues & Practice in the Netherlands (SASS 375B/575)

 

Program Dates: March 10 – March 19, 2017

Pre-trip seminars January 28 and February 18; post-trip seminar April 8

 

Course Leaders:

Patrick Boyle

 

Approved for: Global and Cultural Diversity credit, Social Science credit for Engineering students, Social Work Minor credit, Elective Course credit

 

Course description: This 3-credit course will take students to a range of treatment settings and provide interaction with Dutch clinicians, managers and people receiving services. Students learn a great deal about similarities and differences between how Americans and the Dutch view mental health and substance use disorders, and, more importantly, how we treat the people we serve. Included are visits to treatment clinics, residential treatment centers, user rooms, prisons as well as universities. Presentations are given by government officials, practicing social workers, health care providers and many of Holland’s most prominent scholars. The experience will challenge students to compare Dutch mental health and co-occurring substance abuse treatment practices with the United States. Students with an interest in mental health and substance abuse issues are encouraged to enroll in this course.

 

The course begins with a brief orientation on late Saturday afternoon and Saturday evening is free to explore the city! Sunday is also an open day, but Sunday evening is reserved for a walking tour of the Red Light District. Students will have unstructured free time on the weekend after the course to travel. Tentative schedule (subject to change):

  • Monday: lectures from Dutch experts at Vrije Universiteit (Free University) in Amsterdam on Dutch tolerance, euthanasia, substance use and abuse, and sex work (prostitution) (http://www.english.uva.nl/start.cfm)
  • Tuesday: visit Mentrum/Arkin, Amsterdam’s primary integrated (mental health and substance use) care organization, which is the result of three organizational mergers, a process that has also begun in America (https://www.mentrum.nl/over-mentrum/)
  • Tuesday: symposium on Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment (IDDT)
  • Wednesday: travel to Rotterdam and visit with researchers at Erasmus University (http://www.cvd.nl/locaties)
  • Thursday: visit the Dampkring coffee shop (http://www.dampkring.nl/) and converse with a local expert about the history of coffee shops in Amsterdam as well as see the products they sell
  • Thursday: visit Altrecht, an inpatient psychiatric hospital for forensic patients, has exposed us to how the Dutch treat people convicted of crimes and that have mental health disorders (https://www.altrecht.nl/over-ons/visie-missie/)
  • Friday: visit Blaka Watra, a drop-in center where people can find access to a number of services including showers, employment, social services, food, laundry and a “User Room”, i.e., a safe place to use drugs (http://www.deregenboog.org/en/where/blaka-watra)
  • Friday: the “Great Debate” where you have an opportunity to make persuasive arguments for or against various Dutch practices or social policies as they apply here at home (or “not”)

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Chupp, Director of International Education Programs, or Valerie Rambin, International Education Programs Manager about this or other Mandel School study abroad programs. Contact Nancy Issa for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.

 

The Netherlands Social Justice: Health and Violence Prevention (SASS 325/575)

(note: there are two separate sections for undergraduate and graduate students)

 

Program Dates: March 10 – March 19, 2017

Pre-trip seminars January 28 and February 18; post-trip seminar April 8 (April 22 for SASS 325)

 

Course Leaders:

Dean Gilmore (section SASS 325)

Mark Singer (section SASS 575)

 

Approved for: Global and Cultural Diversity credit, Social Science credit for Engineering students, Social Work Minor credit, Elective Course credit

 

Course Description: This experiential and hands-on 3-credit course is designed to familiarize them with Dutch culture, social policies and practices for prostitution, drug use, substance abuse, mental health, neighborhood social control, violence prevention, homelessness; multicultural aspects of health care, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. The trip includes guided tours of neighborhoods and social institutions such as hospitals, clinics, user rooms and prisons.  Presentations are given by government officials, practicing social workers, health care providers and many of Holland’s most prominent scholars. The experience will challenge students to compare Holland with the United States and help students understand the strengths and weaknesses of social policies and human services in both countries.

 

The course begins with a brief orientation on late Saturday afternoon and Saturday evening is free to explore the city! Sunday is also an open day, but Sunday evening is reserved for a walking tour of the Red Light District. Students will have unstructured free time on the weekend after the course to travel. Tentative schedule (subject to change):

  • Monday: lectures from Dutch experts at Vrije Universiteit (Free University) in Amsterdam on Dutch tolerance, euthanasia, substance use and abuse, and sex work (prostitution) (http://www.english.uva.nl/start.cfm)
  • Tuesday: visit the Dampkring coffee shop (http://www.dampkring.nl/) and converse with a local expert about the history of coffee shops in Amsterdam as well as see the products they sell
  • Tuesday: visit the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the largest tertiary care hospital in the country (http://www.amc.nl/) and meet with the medical director of the hospital to discuss how differently they manage their health care system than we do in the U.S.
  • Wednesday: travel to Rotterdam to meet with staff and clients at S Gravenhof (http://www.cvd.nl/afdeling/crisiscentrum-rotterdam-ccr), a halfway house for hard drugs users
  • Wednesday: visit Horizon (http://www.horizon-jeugdzorg.nl/),  a residential treatment center for severely physically and emotionally abused children ages 8-12
  • Thursday: visit Blacka Watra, a drop-in center where people can find access to a number of services including showers, employment, social services, food, laundry and a “User Room”, i.e., a safe place to use drugs (http://www.deregenboog.org/content/index.html?name=page&id=28)
  • Thursday: visit Altrecht, an inpatient psychiatric hospital for forensic patients, has exposed us to how the Dutch treat people convicted of crimes and that have mental health disorders (https://www.altrecht.nl/over-ons/visie-missie/)
  • Thursday: an alternative option is to visit the main courthouse in Amsterdam to meet with Dutch prosecutors
  • Friday: a lecture by COSA Netherlands (http://www.cosanederland.nl/en/start), a community reintegration program for sexual offenders with a  network of volunteers that befriend the clients and help them feel more socially connected to the community while also being on alert for signs of potential problems to decrease the incidence of re-offending
  • Friday: the “Great Debate” where you have an opportunity to make persuasive arguments for or against various Dutch practices or social policies as they apply here at home (or “not”)

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Chupp, Director of International Education Programs, or Valerie Rambin, International Education Programs Manager about this or other Mandel School study abroad programs. Contact Nancy Issa for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.

Invisible Groups in a New Poland(SASS 375C/575)

Program Dates: March 11 – March 19, 2017

Pre-trip seminars January 28 and February 18; post-trip seminar April 8

 

Course Leaders:

Kathleen Farkas

Richard Romaniuk

 

Approved for: Global and Cultural Diversity credit, Social Science credit for Engineering students, Social Work Minor credit, Elective Course credit

 

Course description: This 3-credit course introduces students to Polish culture and Polish social policies and practices concerning disenfranchised, stigmatized and disempowered social groups. The course will encourage students to understand how Poland’s recent political and economic transformations affect society in general, and some groups in particular. The course will focus on how Polish society addresses problems of poverty, homelessness, aging, domestic violence and mental health disorders. In cooperation with the Institute of Sociology at the University of Poznan, students and faculty will use frameworks such as multiculturalism, social integration, feminism and determinants of social exclusion to understand Polish policy responses to various social phenomena. Students will have opportunities to engage government officials, practicing social workers, and some of Poland’s most prominent scholars in conversation. In addition to lectures and workshops, the trip includes guided tours of neighborhoods and social institutions. Cultural events and outings will provide additional insights into Polish society and the Polish people. This course was designed with cooperation from the Institute of Sociology at the University of Poznan.

 

Tentative schedule (subject to change):

 

 

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Chupp, Director of International Education Programs, or Valerie Rambin, International Education Programs Manager about this or other Mandel School study abroad programs. Contact Nancy Issa for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.

Country

Course Topic

Dates

*Approximate Cost

Ecuador SASS 375A / 575
Health, Human and Social Development
Winter Break 2016
Jan 1 – 15, 2017
Pre-Seminars: Sept 24 & Nov 5 Post-Seminar: Jan 28, 2017

$3,995
Flight Included

India
SASS 375G / 575
Global Health and Social Development
Winter Break 2016
Jan 1 – 15, 2017
Pre-Seminars: Sept 24 & Nov 5 Post-Seminar: Jan 28, 2017
$4,995
Flight Included
Guatemala SASS 375D / 575
Child Welfare
Spring Break 2017
Mar 10/11 – 19, 2017 Pre-Trip Seminars: Jan 28 & Feb 20 Post-Trip Seminar: April 15
$2,650
Flight Included
Netherlands SASS 325 / 575
Social Justice: Health & Violence Prevention  SASS 375B / 575
Mental Health Issues & Practice
SASS 375F / 575
Gender & Sexuality Justice: LGBT Life
Spring Break 2017
Mar 12 – 19, 2017
Suggested Travel Date: Mar 10
Pre-Trip Seminars: Jan 28 & Feb 18 Post-Trip Seminar: April 8
$2,250
Flight Not Included
Poland SASS 375C / 575
Invisible Groups
Spring Break 2017
Mar 11 – 19, 2017
Pre-Trip Seminars: Jan 28 & Feb 28 Post-Trip Seminar: TBD
$2,950
Flight Included
Ghana
SASS 375G / 575
21st Century Ghana: Culture, Institutions and Development in West Africa
Spring (May Abroad) 2017
May 14 – 29, 2017
Pre-Trip Seminars: Feb 18 & April 8
Post-Trip Seminar: TBD
$4,050
Flight Included

Courses during spring break must be registered as a Spring semester course.

  • Visit http://msass.case.edu/international/ to learn more
  • Apply for course atcase.edu. Click on “Program Search,” type MSASS under “Program Name” and select the course you are interested in taking
  • Contact Mark Chupp, (mgc2@case.edu) or Valerie Rambin (var26@case.edu) in Mandel School International Programs to schedule an advising meeting
  • Contact Nancy Issa, nxi@case.edu for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures
  • Pay $200 deposit to the Center for International Affairs. The rest of the program fee will be billed to your student account along with your tuition.
  • Register on SIS after your application is accepted
  • Credits Approved for:
    • Global and Cultural Diversity for Arts & Sciences
    • Social Science for Engineering
    • Social Work Minor
    • Elective

* Program fees are separate from tuition and include the following: in-country travel, most meals (depending on the program), double occupancy accommodation, instructional materials, agency visits, guest lecturers, program fees, most excursions and cultural events, and international airfare unless noted otherwise above. Fees will be billed with tuition from Bursar’s office and deposits will go through Office of International Affairs.


Mandel School Students

  • Contact Program Director Dr. Mark Chupp OR Program Manager Valerie Rambin (Valerie.Rambin@case.edu) to set up a meeting.
  • Contact Nancy Issa for Financial Aid eligibility details and procedures.
  • Apply on  studyabroad.case.edu. Click on “program search.” Type MSASS under “Program Name.” Select the country you are interested in from the drop-down menu. Once you click on the Search button, information on the trip will appear at the bottom of the page. For any questions about the application, please contact studyabroad@case.edu.
  • Pay the $200 deposit to the Center for International Affairs. CWRU students: The rest of the program fee will be billed from the Bursar’s Office along with your tuition. Information on how to pay the deposit is on application. To pay online or in person via credit, call the Center for International Affairs: 216-368-2517.
  • Registration for CWRU students: Start your registration on SIS after your application is accepted. All students outside of the Mandel School require permission to register. A registrar from another department will be sent a request to give you permission.
  • Registration for students from other universities and interested professionals: Students from other universities should register for an Independent Study (or the equivalent) at their own university. CWRU faculty will give the university instructor information on the student’s performance in the course. Students from other universities and interested professionals must pay the standard travel fees plus an administrative fee of $400. This fee covers some administrative costs of the program that is ordinarily covered by tuition.
  • Order a passport. If you already have a passport, check that the expiration date has not passed. Renew your passport if it expires within 6 months after the return date. For more information, see the U.S. Department of State’s site for U.S. Passports & International Travel or contact the National Passport Information Center (1-877-487-2778) for more information.
  • Order a visa. If you have a non-U.S. passport, please determine whether a visa is required. If a visa is needed, we strongly recommend that you use a visa service such as Travel Document.com or Travisa.com. Although you do pay for their services, they will ensure that you have all the proper documents to obtain a visa in a timely manner.
  • Verify your medical insurance. Case Western Reserve does provide medical insurance (with restrictions) for all participants. In certain instances, including non-emergency medical situations, you may be required to pre-pay your medical care and/or related costs and then seek reimbursement afterward.
  • Update your vaccinations. Learn about vaccines prior to traveling. Please check the Center for Disease Control website unless you are traveling to the Netherlands and Poland, where vaccinations aren’t needed. Visit your family physician, health clinic, or the University Health Service (UHS) on the Case Western Reserve campus. UHS can provide students with any travel medicine and vaccines needed for trips. Students are only required to pay for vaccines or prescriptions that are filled at a pharmacy. To make an appointments, contact UHS (216-368-4539) or visit the UHS website.


Reflections from faculty and students on their study abroad experience.

Hannah Bidigare-Curtis, Undergraduate Student (Major: Biology and Environmental Studies), on Health, Human and Social Development in Ecuador (2013)

I gained a ton of perspective on this trip. Learning about different ways of life and attitudes from the indigenous groups that we visited; actually seeing…pretty much everything we did on the trip just expanded my smaller-town view of the world. After experiences like these, what happened becomes so tightly intertwined with how I now view the world that I can hardly remember what it was like to not have gone on the trip.

 

Mary Wills, Graduate Student (Social Work MSSA), on Global Health and Social Development in India (2015)

I think that overall the experience was life changing. I learned more about myself in a two-week period than I have in 23 years, made some close friends and got closer to the ones that I already had. I also learned a lot from the hospital and social activist discussions and learned more about American culture in the process. I am still processing the entire trip. Every day I remember something different about India and how it has affected me.

 

Dylan Brown, Undergraduate Student (Major: Psychology) on Invisible Groups in a New Poland (2016)

When I first decided to go to Poland, I never anticipated it would be one of the most impactful experiences of my life. Experiencing such a different, yet wonderful culture helped me appreciate the incredible diversity we have in our world. My time in Poland expanded my worldview in a way that would have been impossible if I remained in America. The most surprising aspect of these visits, and indeed the entire trip, was the passion I saw in every social worker we encountered.

 

Teresa Mowen, Graduate Student (Social Work MSSA/CNM) on Child Welfare in Guatemala (2011)

Individual growth is a component of education, and growth certainly occurs when one travels to an area outside of their own familiarity. With each opportunity to travel abroad comes a different growth opportunity. Guatemala was an amazing experience, to say the least; the people, the food, the deep rich culture and the atrocities which fill their history. Meeting the people and seeing with my own eyes the obvious disparity between rich and poor strengthened my resolve to learn more about other areas of the world and ways in which we can provide comfort, equality and empowerment to vulnerable populations at home and abroad.”

 

Ben Ratner, Undergraduate Student (Major: Computer Science) on The Netherlands Social Justice: Health and Violence Prevention (2016)

I learned a lot and really got new insight on American social customs and practices. You always hear about the Netherlands being very different, but seeing it firsthand and learning from real citizens was a phenomenal experience. I’m so grateful to have been able to go.

 

Emilie Wyszynski, Graduate Student (Social Work MSSA/MNO) on The Netherlands Mental Health Issues and Practice (2016)

Study abroad gave me a spark I’ve been missing all my life. Studying abroad was life changing to the core. I came home a completely different person


Read a cross-cultural perspective from Mandel School faculty member and alumnus Patrick Boyle.

Check out photo galleries from India, EcuadorPoland, and the Netherlands.