children-lead-poisoning-2013-mapNEO CANDO  makes lead hazard information publicly available. The Plain Dealer in “Five ways to reduce lead poisoning in Cleveland explored so far” discusses about how NEO CANDO helps to make information available to the public. An analysis of Cleveland lead inspection data and county property transfer records maintained by the Poverty Center’s NEO CANDO shows that in a five-year period, roughly 140 properties the city identified as lead hazards were transferred to new owners.

According to the article about 60 of the properties were auctioned at Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s sales and 80 more were transferred through other types of sales. Cleveland, by law, requires property owners to fill out a form indicating whether the home they are selling was condemned or had code violations. Lead hazards aren’t included on this city “Certificate of Disclosure” form.

The Poverty Center has been examining the effects of lead poisoning and prevention for numerous years. Click here for recent news from the Poverty Center about lead poisoning in children.

Read the full article at Cleveland.com and click here to know more about NEO CANDO.

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