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singer

Mark I. Singer

Leonard W. Mayo Professor in Family and Child Welfare

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College
M.S.S.A., Case Western Reserve University
Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations

2nd Floor
Case Western Reserve University
11402 Bellflower Court
Cleveland, Ohio 44106
mark.singer@case.edu

About

Mark I. Singer is the Leonard W. Mayo Professor of Family and Child Welfare at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. He is currently the deputy director of the Semi J. and Ruth W. Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education and co-director of the Center on Substance Abuse and Mental Illness.
Read more about Mark Singer

Course List

  • SASS 608 Philosophy of Science and Theory Construction
  • SASS 564 Social Work Interventions in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse
  • SSBT 501 Advanced Child/Adolescent Development and Dysfunction

Scholarly Interests

youth violence, adolescent behavior problems, co-existing drug and mental disorders, community policing.

Why I Chose this Profession

I enjoyed working with juvenile delinquents in Brooklyn, NY. There were no employment opportunities for philosophers (B.A. in philosophy).


Recent Publications

Butcher, F., Kretschmar, J., Lin, Y., Flannery, D.  & Singer, M. (In Press) Analysis of the Validity Scales in the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children. Social Work Research.

Bartholomew, J., Singer, M., Gonzalez, A. & Walker, M. (2013). Police assisted referrals: Empowering law enforcement to be first social responders.  Law Enforcement Executive Forum, 13(4), 38-49.

Recent Presentations

Singer, M., Gonzalez, A. & Walker, M. (2013, June).  Building trust to fight crime: Cleveland’s Police Assisted Referral Program.  Presentation at the Addressing Violent Crime in the 21st Century Conference, U.S. Attorneys, U.S. Department of Justice, Columbia,  South Carolina.


Mark Singer in the News:


Research Colloquium: Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction

Oct 29 2016

mandel-community-studies-center
Friday, November 11, 2016,

Colloquium: 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM EST

Meet the Speakers: 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

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All are invited to Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction: A Remedy That Needs More Than Medicine, a FREE research colloquium at 12:30 to 2:00 p.m. EST on Friday, November 11, 2016, in room #108 of the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Community Studies Center at 11402 Bellflower Road on the campus of Case Western Reserve University. Lunch will be provided.

Free and open to all. 1.5 social work CEUs are available for in-person attendees ($10 for CWRU alumni; $25 for non-alumni). To attend online via livestream, click the livestream option when RSVPing and you will be provided a link as the event date approaches. No CEUs are available for livestream attendees

Presented by the Mandel School’s Office of Research Administration and the Doctoral Program, 2016-2017 Research & Training Colloquia are part of the Centennial Speaker Series and are “Featuring Our Own,” spotlighting the Mandel School’s own groundbreaking research.

COLLOQUIUM TOPIC

A report of data from the Begun Center’s evaluation of certified drug courts in Ohio, a state that has realized large increases in opioid-related morbidity and mortality. Their sample of 404 drug court participants at intake suggests a variety of comorbid problems including mental illness, violence exposure, serious health risk behaviors and low educational, housing and employment statuses. The results will be discussed in the contexts of clinical programs and state/national policy.

SPEAKERS

Margaret Baughman Sladky, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education

Mark Singer, PhD, Leonard W. Mayo Professor of Family and Child Welfare and Deputy Director of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education

STUDENT INFO 

Mandel School students receive 1.5 PD hours for attending (online and intensive weekend students who watch via livestream can receive 1.5 PD hours by submitting a brief summary to their field advisor). On-campus students can also visit with the speakers immediately following the colloquium.

For more details about this and other Mandel School Centennial Speaker Series events, visit http://msass.case.edu/Centennial

Questions? Please email MandelSchool@case.edu or call 216.368.2270.


2016-2017 Research Colloquia Series Announced

Sep 8 2016

Elizabeth M. Tracy, PhD, Associate Dean for Research and Training at the Mandel School, announced the 2016-2017 Research and Training Colloquia. Part of the Centennial Speaker Series, this year’s colloquia will feature the Mandel School’s own groundbreaking research. The events are free, open to all, and include lunch. Those who want CEUs may purchase them ($10 for alumni; $25 for non-alumni). Students will receive PD hours for each colloquium and can visit with speakers immediately following their presentations.

All of the events are from 12:30 to 2:00 p.m. at the Mandel Community Studies Center (11402 Bellflower) Room 108 unless otherwise noted. The 2016-2017 colloquia are:

Longitudinal Study of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure:  Methodological Issues and Findings
Wednesday, September 21 | 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.  | Mandel Community Studies Center Room 115

Dr. Gale Richardson from the University of Pittsburgh will discuss the methodological issues involved in studying drug use during pregnancy at a Distinguished Lecture Series event on Wednesday, September 21, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 108 of the Mandel Community Studies Center. She will describe her longitudinal study of prenatal cocaine exposure and highlight some of the findings from this 25-year program of research.

Gale A. Richardson, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh. Over an academic career spanning 30 years, she has published numerous peer reviewed articles on the developmental effects of prenatal cocaine, alcohol, and marijuana exposure and has an extensive record of NIH-funded research and training grants.

Career Trajectories for Women in Academic Research

As part of the Distinguished Lecture Series, Dr. Gale Richardson will meet with students, faculty and staff to describe her career trajectory in academic research and will lead an informal discussion on factors to consider in choosing a career path. This event is on Thursday, September 22, at noon to 2:00 p.m. at the Flora Stone Mather Center for Women at the Tinkham Veale University Center on campus.


Sexual Assault Kits:  Changing What We Know About Rape
Friday, October 28 | 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Starting in 2013, the Cuyahoga County Sexual Assault Kit (SAK) Task Force began investigating and prosecuting cases from approximately 5,000 previously unsubmitted SAKs from 1993 to 2010. For the Cuyahoga County SAK Pilot Research Project, a research team at the Begun Center at the Mandel School coded a random sample of 243 SAKs with completed investigations and either resulted in prosecution or were not pursued due to insufficient evidence. This presentation will provide an overview of the issue with unsubmitted SAKs, key findings from the research, and how these findings are being used to inform and reform rape investigations and prosecutions.

Featuring:
Rachel Lovell, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education
Daniel Flannery, PhD, Semi J. and Ruth W. Begun Professor and Director of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education
Misty Luminais, PhD, Senior Research Associate and Project Coordinator, Social Justice Institute


Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction:  A Remedy That Needs More Than Medicine
Friday, November 11 | 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

A report of data from the Begun Center’s evaluation of certified drug courts in Ohio, a state that has realized large increases in opioid-related morbidity and mortality. Their sample of 404 drug court participants at intake suggests a variety of comorbid problems including mental illness, violence exposure, serious health risk behaviors and low educational, housing and employment statuses. The results will be discussed in the contexts of clinical programs and state/national policy.

Featuring:
Margaret Baughman Sladky, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education
Mark Singer, PhD, Leonard W. Mayo Professor of Family and Child Welfare and Deputy Director of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education


Use of Community Data by Nonprofits:  Opportunities and Challenges
Friday, January 27 | 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Nonprofit organizations strive to build and serve the community in a variety of ways. A relatively new development to assist nonprofits with this critical task is the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) that incorporate data assembled from area nonprofit organizations. Based on in-depth interviews conducted with 18 sites in the U.S. that have adopted a prominent GIS application, this presentation explores the reasons why nonprofits adopt these systems, their inclusion of various stakeholders in their launch, and the challenges for sustaining GIS use.

Featuring:
Robert Fischer, PhD, Research Professor; Co-Director, Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development; Faculty Director of the Master of Nonprofit Organizations (MNO) Program.


Consensus-based Assessment Tool of Community Readiness and Capacity for Farmers’ Market Implementation
Friday, February 10 | 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Nutrition-related policy, system, and environmental (PSE) change interventions such as farmers’ markets have been recommended as effective strategies for promoting healthy diet for chronic disease prevention. Tools are needed to assess community readiness and capacity factors influencing successful farmers’ market implementation among diverse practitioners in different contexts. The goal of this presentation is to describe a multiphase consensus modeling approach used to develop a diagnostic tool for assessing community readiness and capacity to implement farmers’ market interventions among public health and community nutrition practitioners working with low-income populations in diverse contexts. Findings illuminate a range of implementation factors influencing farmers’ market PSE interventions and offer guidance for tailoring intervention delivery based on levels of community, practitioner, and organizational readiness and capacity.

Featuring:
Eun Lye Lee, PhD, Postdoctoral Scholar, Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine
Darcy Friedman, PhD, Associate Professor, Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine
Jarrod Dalton, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine


Navigating HIPAA, FERPA and the IRB:  Leverage Big Data to Better Serve Children and Families
Friday, February 24 | 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Integrated data systems (IDS) provide significant value for needs identification, program planning, and evaluation across a broad range of social issues. In this colloquium, we highlight lessons learned about the use of Protected Health Information (PHI) from two research studies: 1) a county-funded evaluation of early childhood mental health service receipt, and 2) a longitudinal analysis of the association between lifetime lead exposure and kindergarten readiness.

Featuring:
Elizabeth Anthony, PhD, Research Assistant Professor
Robert Fischer, PhD, Researcher Professor and Co-Director of the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development


Cleveland Effective Neighboring Project
Friday, March 24 | 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

“Effective neighboring” is the process of neighbors from diverse social, economic and cultural backgrounds, establishing a level of familiarity and shared expectations that enable them to live comfortably together. The goal of this project is to learn from existing examples of effective neighboring in Cleveland and determine how to promote and sustain it in more areas of our city and other cities.

Featuring:
Mark Joseph, PhD, Associate Professor; Director, National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities
Mark Chupp, PhD, Assistant Professor; Director, International Education Program


Research ShowCASE on April 15th Features Mandel School

Apr 15 2016

Research ShowCASEOn April 15, hundreds of researchers, scientists and scholars will gather in Case Western Reserve’s Veale Convocation Center for the annual Research ShowCASE, a day filled with exploration and discovery of the university’s exciting research. Check out the full list of Mandel School presenters below, including many faculty members, students and researchers

Faculty (highlighted), Research Staff, and Doctoral Students (bold):

1. Cyleste Collins, Rong Bai, David Crampton, Rob Fischer: “Partnering for Family Success Process Evaluation”

2. Dalhee Yoon, Paul Tuschman, Mark, I. Singer, Margaret Baughman-Sladky, Michael C. Gearhart: “Case Study: Staff Perspectives on the use of Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) in Drug Courts Serving Opioid-Addicted Clients”

3. Dalhee Yoon, David S. Crampton, Susan Yoon, Sarah K. Bearman: “Assessing the Impact of Family Participation on Team Decisionmaking”

4. David Crampton, Claudia Coulton, Francisca Garcia-Cobian Richter, Rob Fischer: “Integrated Data System Analysis for the Design of a Pay-for-Success Intervention in Foster Care”

5. Aviva Vincent, David L. Hussey, Michelle Riske-Morris: “Reversing the Pipeline: Examining the Need for Transition Planning from Prison to the Community”

6. Michael C. Gearhart, Daniel J. Flannery, Mark I. Singer, Jeff Kretschmar, Fred Butcher: “Predictors of Functioning in a Juvenile Justice Diversion Program: ADHD, Mental Health, and Trauma”

7. Robert Fischer, Elizabeth Anthony, Nina Lalich, Marci Blue, Tsui Chan: “Childhood Lead Exposure in the City of Cleveland: Why Point-in-Time Estimates Aren’t Enough”

8. Seungjong Cho, Sun Kyung Kim: “Adjustment Problems of Female Spouses of International Students: Theoretical Frameworks” (Oral Presentation)

9. Weidi Qin: “Patterns of Diabetes Among Asian Americans”

Undergraduate Students (Research Advisor: Sharon Milligan):

1. Chelsea Smith: “The Causes and Treatments for Eating Disorders: A literature Review”

2. Amy Wang: “The relationship between socioeconomic status and other demographic factors and dental health behavior”

3. Feifei Deng: “Oral Health and Its Impact on General Health: A Literature Review of Society’s Response”

4. Isabelle Haney: “Mental Health Prevalence, Stigma, and Resources among College Students”

5. Amarinder Syan: “The Impact of Food Deserts on Food Insecurity in the United States”

Undergraduate Students (Research Advisor: Megan Holmes):

1. Michaela Epperson: “Beliefs, Resiliency, and Experiences with Intimate Partner Violence”

Undergraduate Students (Research Advisor: Debra R. Hrouda):

1. Debra Hrouda, Jennifer Collins-Lakner, Christopher Mayer, Megan Mathur: “Identifying the Critical Ingredients of an Evidence-Based Practice: Seeking Expert Opinions”

MSSA Students (Research Advisor: Debra R. Hrouda):

1. Debra Hrouda, Jennifer Collins-Lakner, Christopher Mayer, Megan Mathur:

“Identifying the Critical Ingredients of an Evidence-Based Practice: A Targeted Literature Review”