mahoney

Gerald Mahoney, PhD

Director, Center on Intervention for Children and Families
Verna Houck Motto Professor


PhD, George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University
MA, Xavier University, MA Psychology
BS, Xavier University, Psychology
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Room 206
Case Western Reserve University
11235 Bellflower Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44106

gerald.mahoney@case.edu

About

Gerald Mahoney, Ph.D. is the Verna Houck Motto Professor of Families and Community at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University. He has been involved in research and higher education for 30 years.Dr. Mahoney’s research has focused primarily on parent and family influences on children’s development and social emotional functioning. He has published numerous studies on parent influences on the development of children at-risk or with disabilities, as well as on the application of research findings from the parent-child literature to early intervention practice.
Read full biosketch.

Course List

  • SASS 613 – Advanced Research Design
  • SSBT 542 – Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
  • SSBT 501 – Advanced Child and Adolescent Development and Dysfunction

Scholarly Interests

  • Family and Parental Influences on Children’s Development and Socio-Emotional Well being
  • Early Intervention for At-Risk Children and Children with Disabilities
  • Early Childhood Mental Health

Affiliations

Council on Exceptional Children

Why I chose this profession

I began my professional career in the early 1970′s as a special education teacher for elementary school aged children. Because I felt strongly that the types of educational procedures I was using with these children were of limited value, I began to examine the research literature related to mental retardation. I hoped that this literature would help me better understand the factors that contributed to children’s developmental delays, which in turn would help me develop more effective instructional procedures for working with these children.My personal interest in this research literature helped me to understand that although there were many theories about mental retardation, there was little empirical research to support these as a viable foundation for developing more effective educational procedures. This stimulated my interest in pursuing a career in which I could conduct investigations and develop more effective interventions for children with a wide range of disabilities.


Recent Publications

Mahoney, G.. (2013). Assimilative practice and developmental intervention.  International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education, 5, 45-65.

Karaslan, O.  Diken, I., & Mahoney, G. (2013).  A randomized control study of responsive teaching with young Turkish children and their mothers. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 33, 18-27.

Diken, O, Mahoney, G. (2013). Interactions between Turkish mothers and preschool children with autism.  Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 51, 190-200.

Kim, J. & Mahoney, G. (2013). Responsive Teaching: Parent Education. Seoul, Korea: Changjisa Publishing

Karaslan, O.  & Mahoney, G. (In Press).  Effectiveness of responsive teaching with children with Down syndrome. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Alquraini, T. & Mahoney, G. (In Press). The role of parenting stress in relationship focused intervention: Comparison of parents of children with pervasive developmental disorders to parents of children with other disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

Mahoney, G.. (2013). Assimilative practice and developmental intervention.  International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education, 5, 45-65.

Karaslan, O.  Diken, I., & Mahoney, G. (2013).  A randomized control study of responsive teaching with young Turkish children and their mothers. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 33, 18-27.

Diken, O, Mahoney, G. (2013). Interactions between Turkish mothers and preschool children with autism.  Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 51, 190-200.

Kim, J. & Mahoney, G. (2013). Responsive Teaching: Parent Education. Seoul, Korea: Changjisa Publishing

Karaslan, O., Diken, I., & Mahoney, G. (2011). The effectiveness of the responsive teaching parent mediated developmental intervention program in Turkey: A Case Study. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education. 58, 359–372.

Mahoney, G., & Nam, S. (2011). The parenting model of developmental intervention. In R. M.. Hodapp (Ed.), International Review of Research on Mental Retardation (Vol. 41, pp.73–125). New York, NY: Academic Press.

Mahoney, G., & Perales, F. (2011). The Role of Parents of Children with Down Syndrome and Other Disabilities in Early Intervention. In J. A. Rondal, J. Perera, & D. Spiker, (Eds.), Neurocognitive rehabilitation of Down Syndrome: The early years (pp. 205–223).  New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Kim, J. M., & Mahoney, G. (2009). Parent-child interactive behavior assessment: K-MBRS & C-MBRS. Seoul, Republic of Korea: Pakhaksa Publishing.

Mahoney, G., Perales, F., & Kim, J. (2010). Korean developmental rainbow: Early childhood development profile. Seoul, Republic of Korea: Hakjisa Publishing.

Recent Presentations

Dikem, O., & Mahoney, G. (September, 2012).  Interactions between Turkish mothers and preschool children with Autism. Presented at the 1st International Early Intervention Conference;  Eurylaid Annual Conference 2012, Braga, Portugual.


Gerald Mahoney in the News:


Announcing the Early Intervention Related Services Training Program for 2017

Mar 3 2017
The next training cohort begins the summer of 2017. The deadline for applying to this program is March 23.
This interdisciplinary specialty training program is designed for CWRU graduate students from Social Work and Speech Language Pathology who are interested in working with young children at-risk or with disabilities and their families. It is designed to provide students the competencies and professional skills that are needed to become certified early intervention service providers.
Trainees receive a $2,500 stipend and full tuition support for the summer institute. They also receive fellowship for $13,500.00 for the 2107-2018 academic year.

Training entails an 8 week summer institute in which students:
(a) Complete 6 hours of coursework (Early Intervention Theory and Practice; Birth to Three Child Development; and Developmental Disabilities: Theories and Practice); and
(b) Participate in an intensive structured practicum and in which they learn the skills required for assessing and providing relationship based developmental intervention services to young children with disabilities and their parents.
** During the following academic year trainees are required to do their practicum training in an agency or school that serves young children with disabilities and their families.

Students interested in applying for this program or who would like additional information should contact:
Telephone: 216-368-1824

The Early Intervention Related Services Training Program (EIRSTP) is funded by a personnel preparation grant from the United States Office of Special Education Programs.

Interdisciplinary Training: The Early Intervention Related Service Training Program

May 9 2015

mahoney

The Early Intervention Related Service Training Program (EIRSTP) is a collaborative project between the Department of Communication Sciences at Case Western Reserve University and the Mandel School, where it is directed by Gerald Mahoney, PhD, Verna Houck Motto Professor of Families and Communities.

The program is designed to provide speech-language pathology students and social work students the professional skills needed to become certified early intervention service providers for young, at-risk children or children with disabilities and their families. The interdisciplinary specialty program was funded by a grant from the United States Office of Special Education Programs.

This project addresses the significant shortages of social workers and speech-language pathologists qualified to provide services to children birth to age 5 with disabilities. During each year of the five-year project, four speech-language pathology graduate students and social work graduate students will be accepted into the EIRSTP. The result will be a total of 40 additional related services personnel qualified and credentialed to provide evidence-based services to Ohio’s eligible infants, toddlers and preschoolers in Part C Early Intervention (EI) and Part B Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE).

× “Studying with the speech therapy students provided a unique experience and perspective of combining two schools of thought that I have been able to implement into my current field placement.”

Kaitlin Carden

Trainees receive a stipend and tuition support to attend a summer institute on early intervention, plus tuition support for the following academic year. The first training cohort began in the summer of 2014.

For more information, contact Gerald Mahoney, PhD, Verna Houck Motto Professor at the Mandel School (gerald.mahoney@case.edu) or Barbara A. Lewis, PhD, Professor, Department of Psychological Sciences, Communication Disorders program (barbara.lewis@case.edu).