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Daniel Flannery, PhD

Semi J. and Ruth W. Begun Professor
Director of Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education
PhD, The Ohio State University
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel
School of Applied Social Sciences
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106-7164
daniel.flannery@case.edu

About

Daniel Flannery is the Dr. Semi J. and Ruth Begun Professor and Director of the Begun Center for Violence PreventionResearch and Education at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (MSASS) at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). His primary areas of research are in youth violence prevention, the link between violence and mental health, and program evaluation.
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The Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education

DANIEL J. FLANNERY, Ph.D is Director of the Begun Center. He has written articles for The New England Journal of Medicine and for Developmental Psychology and has published several books discussing topics such as school violence, violence and mental health, and violent behavior and aggression. His most recent book, Wanted on Warrants: The Fugitive Safe Surrender Program, chronicles Dan’s involvement in the United State Marshal’s Fugitive Safe Surrender Program. | Read More |beguncenterweb
The Dr. Semi J. and Ruth W. Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Educationis a research center in the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University. The Begun Center has a long record of applied community-based research, training, advocacy, and technical assistance over the past two decades.The Begun Center’s professional staff of 25 social scientists, some with a master’s degree, other with a Ph.D. in a wide range of disciplines including psychology, education, social work, sociology, anthropology, and criminal justice, includes nationally recognized scholars whose publications are well cited in research on exposure to violence, mental health, youth gangs, correctional management, and organizational culture. These researchers have experience in county, state, and federally funded research and evaluation projects, including large-scale multi-state and multi-county designs.

Flannery, D.J. (In press).  Wanted on Warrants: The Fugitive Safe Surrender Program.  Kent, OH: Kent State University Press.

Brunell, A., Davis, M., Schley, D., Eng, A., Van Dulmen, M., Wester, K., & Flannery, D. (In press).  A new measure of interpersonal exploitativeness.  Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences.

Baughman, M., Hussey, D., Flannery, D., & Jefferis, E. (In press). Adolescent delinquency and violent behavior.  In T. Gullotta & G. Adams, Eds., Handbook of Adolescent Behavioral Problems: Evidence-based approaches to prevention and treatment.  New York: Springer.

Kretschmar, J., Butcher, F., & Flannery, D. (In press).  Aspects of bullying and its relationship to suicide.  In Van Dulmen, M., Bossarte, R. & Swahn, M. (Eds.),  Developmental and Public Health  Perspectives on Suicide Prevention:  An Integrated Approach.  SkiKnow Press.

Mata, A., van Dulmen, M., Schinka, K., Swahn, M., Bossarte, R., & Flannery, D.J., (in press).  Extracurricular activity involvement is associated with adolescent suicidality through school belongingness.  Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies.

Flannery, D.J., van Dulmen, M.H., & Mata, A. (in press).  Developmental trajectories of exposure to violence.  In M.J. Delisi & K. Beaver (Eds.),  The life-Course of Antisocial Behavior:  Aggression to Delinquency to Crime.  Boston, MA:  Jones & Bartlett.

Flannery, D.J., Modzeleski, W., & Kretschmar, J. (2013).  Violence and school shootings. Invited Paper. Current Psychiatry Reports, 15, 331-337.

Kretschmar, J.M., Butcher, F., & Flannery, D. (2013).  An evaluation of the behavioral health/juvenile justice initiative.  Behavioral Health in Ohio—Current Research Trends1(2), 18-30.

Flannery, D.J., & Kretschmar, J. (2012).  Overview of Fugitive Safe Surrender:   Program description,  initial findings, and policy implications.  Criminology and Public Policy, 11, 433-435.

Flannery, D.J., & Kretschmar, J. (2012).  Fugitive Safe Surrender:  Program description, initial findings, and policy implications.  Criminology and Public Policy, 11, 437-459.

Kretschmar, J., & Flannery, D. J. (2011). Displacement and suicide risk for juvenile justice-involved youth with mental health issues. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 40, 797–806.

Flannery, D., van Dulmen, M. H., & Mata, A. (2010). Developmental trajectories of exposure to violence. In M.J. Delisi & K. Beaver (Eds.), Criminological theory: A life-course approach. Boston, MA: Jones & Bartlett.

Fleisher, M. S., & Flannery, D. J. (2010). Harm reduction strategies within multi-cultural schools. In S. Uludag, C. Dogutas, O. Dolu, & H. Burker (Eds.), Children at risk and in need of protection: Safe schools (pp. 205–224). Anakara, Turkey: TBMM Basimevi.

Listwan, S. J., Colvin, M., Hanley, D., & Flannery, D. J. (2010). Victimization, social support, and psychological well-being: A study of recently released prisoners. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 37, 1140–1159.

Seck, M., Singer, M., & Flannery, D. J. (2010). Psychological and social characteristics of juvenile offenders with serious mental and behavioral disorders. Corrections Compendium, 35(1),1–7.

Flannery, D., Singer, M., van Dulmen, M., Kretschmar, J., & Belliston, L. (2009). Exposure to violence: Mental health and violent behavior. In. D. Flannery, A. Vazsonyi, & I. Waldman (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Violent Behavior & Aggression (pp. 306–321). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Van Dulmen, M., Goncy, E., Vest, A. & Flannery, D., (2009). Group-Based Trajectory Modeling of Externalizing Behavior Problems from Childhood through Adulthood:  Exploring Discrepancies in the Empirical Findings.  In J. Savage (Ed.), The Development of Persistent Criminality (pp. 288–314). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

helpWanted on Warrants: The Fugitive Safe Surrender Program
Since 2005, the Fugitive Safe Surrender (FSS) program has been implemented in more than twenty cities around the country. Tens of thousands of individuals with active warrants for their arrest have voluntarily surrendered to law enforcement in a church or other neutral setting. The sites are transformed for four days into complete justice systems with pretrial-intake, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and probation/parole and community services staff. Author Daniel J. Flannery has gathered information on who turns themselves in, what the warrant is for, how long the warrant has been active, and what happens to the individual. This collaborative initiative between local and federal law enforcement and community faith-based organizations is unique and has proven to be a successful program that is being copied and initiated throughout the country. ‘Wanted on Warrants’ offers valuable insights into what happens during and after an FSS program and will be welcomed by policymakers and practitioners. | Learn More |


helpThe Cambridge Handbook of Violent Behavior and Aggression
This Handbook provides a comprehensive, multidisciplinary examination of the most current research and thinking about the complex issue of violence and violent behavior. The volume examines a range of theoretical, policy, and research issues and provides a comprehensive overview of aggressive and violent behavior. The Handbook also examines violence at multiple levels: individual, family, neighborhood, and cultural, and across multiple perspectives and systems, including treatment, justice, education, and public health. The Handbook represents the most current and up-to-date research from leading experts around the world. | Learn More |

 


helpViolence and Mental Health in Everyday Life
Clinical psychologist Daniel J. Flannery reveals the impact of violence and victimization in the lives of children and adolescents from a developmental perspective. His case studies show the significance of these mental health issues for the individual, family, neighborhood, and community. He offers lists of professional networks and support, including web sites and readings related to violence and mental health, creating a valuable resource for parents, teachers, social workers, childcare workers, public health officials, police officers and others who interact every day with young people, to help them understand more about child development and how experiences with violence can affect development and daily life. | Learn More |


helpYouth Violence: Prevention, Intervention, and Social Policy
Scholars, public officials, and reporters have described the violence of this decade as epidemic as the homicide rate has doubled for adolescents between 1984 and 1994. Current policy to combat youth violence is primarily reactive, focusing on increased punishments and spending millions of dollars each year on incarceration. Providing the latest research on effective prevention and intervention strategies for reducing youth violence, ‘Youth Violence: Prevention, Intervention, and Social Policy’ is a comprehensive resource for dealing with both perpetrators and victims of violence and understanding the risk factors facing youth. It covers results from tested prevention and intervention programs including practical descriptions, core components for success, evaluation findings, costs, and lessons learned from actual implementations. It also covers intervention techniques that teach pro-social behavior to anti-social youth as well as psychopharmacological and neurobiological issues in the treatment of violent youth. It also provides an extensive reference list of over 700 publications and studies, a practical volume with wide audience appeal, including sociologists, criminologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, educators, counselors, and nurses. | Learn More |

White House Summit | “Taking Action: Creating Model Emergency Management Plans for Schools, Institutions of Higher Education and Houses of Worship”

Participated in a panel discussion for Institutions of Higher Education moderated by FBI Executive Assistant Director Richard McFeely. The other two panels were Schools, moderated by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, and Houses of Worship, moderated by then Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano. | Learn More |

Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office | “No More Massacres: How to Prevent School-Based Violence”

In this special two-day seminar – presented by the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon City, Oregon – Dan focused on community-based violence prevention for school administrators, first responders, mental-health personnel, social workers. and juvenile and corrections staffers. | Learn More |

Big Beaver Falls High School | “Sensible Solutions: A One-Day School Violence Seminar”

Dan participates in a one-day seminar this October which includes leaders of Sandy Hook Promise, two of whom tragically lost children in a classroom, as well as other dedicated experts who conducted and continue to research realistic solutions to the serious problem of violence. | Learn More |

Defending Childhood Initiative
Children’s exposure to violence, whether as victims or as witnesses, is often associated with long-term physical, psychological, and emotional harm. Children exposed to violence are also at a higher risk of engaging in criminal behavior later in life and becoming part of a cycle of violence. In 2010, United States Attorney General Eric Holder launched the Defending Childhood Initiative to address the exposure of America’s children to violence as victims and as witnesses. The Begun Center serves as the evaluation partner for the Cuyahoga County Defending Childhood project. Evaluation activities include identification of appropriate assessment instruments, analysis of screening and pre/post test data for youth receiving trauma-informed care, evaluation of training sessions held for the child-serving agencies in the area, and possible assessment of the effectiveness of a community awareness campaign.
| View Full Project Overview |

Fugitive Safe Surrender (FSS)
The Fugitive Safe Surrender (FSS) program is a unique, creative, and highly successful initiative that encourages persons wanted for non-violent felony or misdemeanor crimes to voluntarily surrender to the law in a faith-based or other neutral setting. The program was originally managed nationally by the United States Marshals Service and is currently funded and managed through Ohio’s Attorney General’s Office. FSS is a community re-entry program for wanted non-violent offenders and offers individuals with felony and misdemeanor warrants the ability to turn themselves in to law enforcement and have their cases adjudicated in a safe and non-violent environment. The goal of Fugitive Safe Surrender is to reduce the risk to law enforcement officers who pursue fugitives, to the neighborhoods in which they hide, and to the fugitives themselves. Authorized by Congress in July 2006, Fugitive Safe Surrender is believed to be the first program of its kind in the nation. The Begun Center provides evaluation services for the FSS program and has been onsite at over 20 FSS operations since 2006. | View Full Project Overview |

In the News

Visit with us at SSWR 2015

Jan 15 2015

SSWR 2015The Mandel School will have a substantial presence at the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) 2015 Annual Conference this week in New Orleans. Stop by Booth #100 to visit with Dean Grover “Cleve” Gilmore, faculty and PhD students who are gathered for the event. Additionally, the following papers and posters will be presented at SSWR (faculty names are in bold and doctoral students/graduates are in italics):

  • Suzanne Brown & Elizabeth M. Tracy, PhD: Parenting competence and the role of children for mothers recovering from substance dependence
  • Youngmin Cho & Kyung-Hoon Han: Mediating role of self-esteem on the relationship between exposure to violence and self-rate health among South Korean middle school
  • Youngmin Cho & Claudia J. Coulton, PhD: The effects of parental nonstandard work schedules on adolescents’ academic achievement in dual-earner kouseholds in South Korea
  • Chia Ling Chung: Empowerment as a mediator in the relationship between social support and internalized stigma in family caregivers of adults with severe mental illness
  • Chia Ling Chung, David E. Biegel, PhD, Ching Wen Chang: Loneliness as a mediator in the relationship between social support and quality of life in adults with severe mental illness
  • David Crampton, PhD; S. K. Bearman, K. Corteselli, & Susan Yoon: Ongoing efforts to develop the evidence-base of team decision making
  • Janelle Duda; Fred Butcher, PhD; Daniel Flannery, PhD; Jeffrey M. Kretschmar, PhD; Stephen Morgano: Individuals with open warrants: Motivations for surrendering at a church
  • Eunlye Lee, Anna Maria Santiago, PhD, & G.C. Galster: Neighborhood influences on smoking and marijuana use among low-income African American and Latino adolescents
  • Hyung Yong Park, Elizabeth M. Tracy, PhD & Meeyoung Oh Min, PhD: Longitudinal associations among sobriety support, substance using members, and substance use at 6 and 12 months post treatment
  • Susan Yoon & Megan R. Holmes, PhD: Child exposure to violence: The underlying effect of trauma symptoms on behavior problems.

Begun Center researchers find Ohio’s Behavioral Health/Juvenile Justice initiative effective

Jan 14 2015

kretschmarAn evaluation of Ohio’s Behavioral Health/Juvenile Justice (BHJJ) initiative in 11 counties by researchers at the Mandel School’s Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education found the program benefits most young offenders diverted from detention centers to community-based agencies to treat mental health issues, drug problems or both.

Jeffrey M. Kretschmar, PhD, research assistant professor at the Begun Center, is the lead author of the article, “Diverting Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth with Behavioral Health Issues from Detention: Preliminary Findings From Ohio’s Behavioral Health Juvenile Justice (BHJJ) Initiative,” in Criminal Justice Policy Review.

Dr. Kretschmar and his team analyzed information from caregivers, social workers and 2,545 young offenders who enrolled in the program between 2006 and 2013. For many, the encounter with the juvenile justice system was the first time they were screened for behavioral health problems. Most showed improvements in functioning and decreases in future delinquency and symptoms related to trauma. Based on the results from diagnostic assessments performed at community behavioral health agencies, nearly 60 percent suffered from a mental health disorder, while 38 percent were diagnosed with both a mental health and substance abuse disorder.

Their conclusion: Juvenile offenders can benefit from diversion programs through community agencies with services for mental health problems and substance abuse that they may not have received in a detention center.

The article presents an overview of BHJJ enrollees’ characteristics and challenges to help court workers and judges match youths with the most appropriate and effective diversion service. BHJJ is a program started 15 years ago at the request of Ohio juvenile court judges with help from the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the Ohio Department of Youth Services. The program serves offenders 10 to 18 years old with mental health issues and substantial behavioral, cognitive and emotional problems. Many also have abused drugs and alcohol, have a history of violent or criminal behavior and have had encounters with various county agencies before appearing in juvenile court.

Kretschmar collaborated on the study with Begun Center researchers Fredrick Butcher, PhD, research associate; Daniel J. Flannery, PhD, director; and Mark I. Singer, PhD, deputy director. The research was funded by Ohio Department of Youth Services and the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (Grant number: 4AS3190).

Roughly two-thirds (67 percent) of the youth who had finished the program did so successfully. The next most common reason for terminating the program was due to some form of out-of-home placement (8 percent).

A review by researchers provides a snapshot of the youths in the program:

• Nearly six in 10 (58 percent) were male.

• Just over half (52 percent) were white.

• About a third had been charged with a felony in the prior 12 months to their enrollment in BHJJ.

• Some reported experiencing physical abuse (18 percent), sexual abuse (nearly 16 percent) and exposure to domestic violence (41 percent).

• Fifteen percent had previously attempted suicide; another 40 percent talked about it.

• Nearly 70 percent had a family history of mental health disorder; 61 percent reported a family history of substance abuse.

The researchers examined the variables that predicted two important outcomes: completing treatment successfully and engaging in future acts of delinquency.

They found that youth who started using alcohol and drugs before age 12 and who were using when they began the program were less likely to complete treatment successfully. They also discovered that youth diagnosed with both a mental health and substance use disorder were less likely to complete treatment successfully.

Kretschmar said previous research has found that youth with both mental health and substance use diagnoses have difficulties staying in treatment and are more likely to relapse.

Youth with earlier, more significant and more recent juvenile court involvement were more likely to be charged with acts of delinquency after involvement in the program. And youth with more complex substance use issues and those suspended or expelled from school before their participation were more likely to commit a new juvenile crime.

Dan Flannery is Panelist for CBS-TV19’s Town Hall on Youth Violence

Jul 1 2014

19 Action News Take Back Our StreetsDaniel Flannery, PhD, the Dr. Semi J. and Ruth W. Begun Professor at the Mandel School and the director of the Begun Center for Violence Prevention Education and Research, was on the panel for CBS-19 Action News’ Town Hall Meeting on July 1 to address and find solutions to youth violence in Cleveland.

The “Taking Back Our Streets” Town Hall was broadcast on WUAB TV-43 and streamed online. Click here to watch the Town Hall in its entirety.